Hot Fudge Kwame Time: Part II

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Re: Hot Fudge Kwame Time: Part II

Postby guest » Thu Oct 10, 2013 1:08 pm

"The governent has asked for a sentence of 28 years. I believe that is in fact what his sentence should be. "


translation: buh-bye
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Re: Hot Fudge Kwame Time: Part II

Postby guest » Thu Oct 10, 2013 1:10 pm

The News made it official

Disgraced former Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick was sentenced to XX years Thursday for a reign of corruption that weakened the city and damaged faith in public officials.


no, wait...
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Re: Hot Fudge Kwame Time: Part II

Postby frank - up in grand blanc » Thu Oct 10, 2013 1:13 pm

He's blinking slowly. Just starting at the judge


I hope that he had himself convinced that he'd get only 12 or less.
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Re: Hot Fudge Kwame Time: Part II

Postby guest » Thu Oct 10, 2013 1:19 pm

Judge says she will recommend that Kilpatrick go to prison in Texas.


that's nice, little Jalaylay and Lemonjello can come visit while on break from prep school
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Re: Hot Fudge Kwame Time: Part II

Postby The Suburban Avenger » Thu Oct 10, 2013 1:30 pm

The judge pretty much dipped the book in concrete before throwing it at him.

The IRS restitution is yet another reason his kids better be damned good football players if they want to go to college.

If he serves the full sentence (doubtful), he'll be 71 when he walks on the right side of the fence again. Not sure what the federal prison system offers in the way of parole or time off for good behavior.

The dude did bad, bad stuff, but taking away his money and ability to steal more is pretty much the ultimate sentence for a guy like Kilpatrick. If he only had to pay back the IRS and city, he'd still be a broke, professional object of scorn and ridicule the rest of his days.
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Re: Hot Fudge Kwame Time: Part II

Postby D-Day » Thu Oct 10, 2013 2:32 pm

The Suburban Avenger wrote:The judge pretty much dipped the book in concrete before throwing it at him.

The IRS restitution is yet another reason his kids better be damned good football players if they want to go to college.

If he serves the full sentence (doubtful), he'll be 71 when he walks on the right side of the fence again. Not sure what the federal prison system offers in the way of parole or time off for good behavior.

The dude did bad, bad stuff, but taking away his money and ability to steal more is pretty much the ultimate sentence for a guy like Kilpatrick. If he only had to pay back the IRS and city, he'd still be a broke, professional object of scorn and ridicule the rest of his days.


As I've been told, he'll serve minimum 85% of his sentence, so that's still a loooong time. Can't wait to see what Ferguson gets. Schadenfraude is in full effect.......
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Re: Hot Fudge Kwame Time: Part II

Postby ldodger » Thu Oct 10, 2013 5:01 pm

Is there any possibility we won't have to hear from him ever again? I'm hoping so. I'm glad he got the 28, now go the fuck away.
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Re: Hot Fudge Kwame Time: Part II

Postby James Scott » Thu Oct 10, 2013 6:54 pm

D-Day wrote:
The Suburban Avenger wrote:The judge pretty much dipped the book in concrete before throwing it at him.

The IRS restitution is yet another reason his kids better be damned good football players if they want to go to college.

If he serves the full sentence (doubtful), he'll be 71 when he walks on the right side of the fence again. Not sure what the federal prison system offers in the way of parole or time off for good behavior.

The dude did bad, bad stuff, but taking away his money and ability to steal more is pretty much the ultimate sentence for a guy like Kilpatrick. If he only had to pay back the IRS and city, he'd still be a broke, professional object of scorn and ridicule the rest of his days.


As I've been told, he'll serve minimum 85% of his sentence, so that's still a loooong time. Can't wait to see what Ferguson gets. Schadenfraude is in full effect.......


He'll serve his time as stated. He'll probably end up out as an ordained minister, fleecing the people once again.
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Re: Hot Fudge Kwame Time: Part II

Postby Andy » Wed Feb 12, 2014 4:44 pm

Seems pretty reasonable to me considering all allegations. More tangible material to throw at the "He didn't get a fair trial!" hold-outs. Not that they're gonna change their mind at this point, but still.


Former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick and his father together cost taxpayers $1.1 million in legal fees that were spent in a public corruption that ended with both son and father getting convicted.

According to court records released today, Kilpatrick's legal tab was $813,806, half of it going to his longtime defense attorney James Thomas, whom Kilpatrick tried to get thrown off the case at the start of trial. Kilpatrick had five court-appointed lawyers during the six-month long trial. Here's what they were paid:

■Thomas: $429,755

■Michael Naughton: $260,625

■Harold Gurewitz: $17,887

■Joseph Niskar: $34,925

■Regina Triplett: $5,280

In addition to lawyer fees for Kilpatrick, another $36,480 was spent on transcripts and $28,853 on service providers, and the following:

■$7,215 for an accountant

■$17,478 for an investigator

■ $2,400 for a jury consultant.

Bernard Kilpatrick's legal bill was $352,777, most of it going to his attorney, John Shea, who received nearly $225,000 for defending the ex-mayor's father in a case that ended with the elder Kilpatrick getting convicted on a single tax charge and sentenced to 15 months in prison.

Kilpatrick received a 28-year prison sentence after getting convicted on numerous counts, including extortion, bribery and fraud. He is appealing.

http://www.freep.com/article/20140212/N ... -legal-tab
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Re: Hot Fudge Kwame Time: Part II

Postby D-Day » Thu Jul 16, 2015 1:10 pm

I wold say good luck with this, but the President just commuted the sentences of 46 felons and lectured us all about the collective blessings that will showered down on the country if we just love them more (facepalm). In fact if we just loved our felons more, trickle down economics will actually work. But I digress. So nothing surprises me anymore.......

Kilpatrick's family hopes for presidential pardon

by Ross Jones

DETROIT (WXYZ) - Family and friends of ex-Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick are hoping President Barack Obama will pardon the ex-mayor and commute his 28-year prison sentence.

Almost eight years ago, Kilpatrick and Obama's stars were rising together. At a 2007 speech at the Detroit Economic Club, they stood side by side.

"I want to first of all acknowledge your great mayor, Kwame Kilpatrick," said then-Senator Obama. "We know that he is going to be doing astounding things for many years to come."

But today, they could not be in more different places. While Obama moved into the White House, Kilpatrick took up space in the big house. That’s where he sits today, unless his family gets their wish.

7 Action News has learned that Kilpatrick’s friends and family are planning to ask President Obama for a pardon. The ex-mayor’s brother-in-law Daniel Ferguson confirms that he and others are hoping that the President will commute the rest of Kilpatrick’s 28-year sentence.

They’re also asking for a pardon for Kilpatrick’s co-defendant Bobby Ferguson too. Both men were found guilty of racketeering, extortion and bribery in 2013.

In a message, Daniel Ferguson wouldn’t say whether he thought the pardons will ever come, but he certainly thinks they’re deserved. “In my opinion,” he wrote, “they did nothing at all to be put in jail.”

http://www.wxyz.com/news/local-news/inv ... ial-pardon
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Re: Hot Fudge Kwame Time: Part II

Postby higgs1634 » Fri Jul 17, 2015 9:40 am

D-Day wrote:I wold say good luck with this, but the President just commuted the sentences of 46 felons [ federal prisoners locked up for nonviolent drug offenses] and lectured us all about the collective blessings that will showered down on the country if we just love them more (facepalm). In fact if we just loved our felons more, trickle down economics will actually work. But I digress. So nothing surprises me anymore.......

The scmaltz laid on a little heavy I'll grant you, but these were commutations, not pardons, they weren't absolved of their crime..they're still felons, they just got out early. The issue is when they got sentenced, reactionary sentencing guidelines enacted during a crime wave meant that they and thousands of others are serving prison terms way longer than what they would receive today.

Again, putting aside the politcal smarm of the "they were just making mistakes" for a minute... it's indisputable that non violent drug charges are handled in vastly different ways depending on the wealth or race of the individual. Jamaal selling crack gets a federal stretch...jimmy selling weed up at UM got a ticket.
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Re: Hot Fudge Kwame Time: Part II

Postby frank - up in grand blanc » Fri Jul 17, 2015 12:00 pm

higgs1634 wrote:
D-Day wrote:I wold say good luck with this, but the President just commuted the sentences of 46 felons [ federal prisoners locked up for nonviolent drug offenses] and lectured us all about the collective blessings that will showered down on the country if we just love them more (facepalm). In fact if we just loved our felons more, trickle down economics will actually work. But I digress. So nothing surprises me anymore.......

The scmaltz laid on a little heavy I'll grant you, but these were commutations, not pardons, they weren't absolved of their crime..they're still felons, they just got out early. The issue is when they got sentenced, reactionary sentencing guidelines enacted during a crime wave meant that they and thousands of others are serving prison terms way longer than what they would receive today.

Again, putting aside the politcal smarm of the "they were just making mistakes" for a minute... it's indisputable that non violent drug charges are handled in vastly different ways depending on the wealth or race of the individual. Jamaal selling crack gets a federal stretch...jimmy selling weed up at UM got a ticket.


Is race explicitly at the heart of how we pursue and punish drug offenders? I'm not an expert in this area, but your example could be read to mean that we rate crack as a much more serious problem than marijuana ( again, not an expert, but off-hand I'd agree that crack is bastard of a problem in comparison to weed), thus the penalties are proportionately higher independent of race. The crack trade may be disproportionately black, but unless society deliberately crafts laws to light up drug dealers specifically because they're black then I'm still missing how the law is unfair. I'll concede that there may be an unintended class bias in the doling out of penalties, but if it's true that Trevor gets only a little slap for selling weed to his suite-mates at school then the Huxtable kid (or an Obama daughter or any other real or fictional black middle/upper-class kid) off at school faces the same level of non-punishment for doing what typifies the less onerous drug trade.


Oh, a giant F.U. to Daniel Ferguson for this one:
“In my opinion,” he wrote, “they did nothing at all to be put in jail.”

I dunno, Danny, something about lying under oath and costing the city millions in needless lawsuits.
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Re: Hot Fudge Kwame Time: Part II

Postby Amadeus » Fri Jul 17, 2015 1:05 pm

frank - up in grand blanc wrote:
higgs1634 wrote:
D-Day wrote:I wold say good luck with this, but the President just commuted the sentences of 46 felons [ federal prisoners locked up for nonviolent drug offenses] and lectured us all about the collective blessings that will showered down on the country if we just love them more (facepalm). In fact if we just loved our felons more, trickle down economics will actually work. But I digress. So nothing surprises me anymore.......

The scmaltz laid on a little heavy I'll grant you, but these were commutations, not pardons, they weren't absolved of their crime..they're still felons, they just got out early. The issue is when they got sentenced, reactionary sentencing guidelines enacted during a crime wave meant that they and thousands of others are serving prison terms way longer than what they would receive today.

Again, putting aside the politcal smarm of the "they were just making mistakes" for a minute... it's indisputable that non violent drug charges are handled in vastly different ways depending on the wealth or race of the individual. Jamaal selling crack gets a federal stretch...jimmy selling weed up at UM got a ticket.


Is race explicitly at the heart of how we pursue and punish drug offenders? I'm not an expert in this area, but your example could be read to mean that we rate crack as a much more serious problem than marijuana ( again, not an expert, but off-hand I'd agree that crack is bastard of a problem in comparison to weed), thus the penalties are proportionately higher independent of race. The crack trade may be disproportionately black, but unless society deliberately crafts laws to light up drug dealers specifically because they're black then I'm still missing how the law is unfair. I'll concede that there may be an unintended class bias in the doling out of penalties, but if it's true that Trevor gets only a little slap for selling weed to his suite-mates at school then the Huxtable kid (or an Obama daughter or any other real or fictional black middle/upper-class kid) off at school faces the same level of non-punishment for doing what typifies the less onerous drug trade.


Oh, a giant F.U. to Daniel Ferguson for this one:
“In my opinion,” he wrote, “they did nothing at all to be put in jail.”

I dunno, Danny, something about lying under oath and costing the city millions in needless lawsuits.


The disparity was plain when you compare apples to apples, or in this case, powder to rock cocaine.

Until the law changed in 2010/2011, there was a 5-year mandatory minimum for possession of crack (but not for powder), and the amount needed to qualify for federal criminal charges were ridiculously skewed. The original ratio was 100:1, meaning you had to have 100 times more (by weight) powder coke before hitting the federal stage.

However, the claim of racism gets really complicated when you realize that the stiff penalties against crack were supported by the Congressional Black Caucus in the mid-80's. That little nugget of contrary evidence got flushed down the memory hole.

On top of that, mere possession charges are handled at the state level rather than the federal, and most states have never had sentencing disparities. It's not users who got the federal charges, but the sellers and pushers.
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Re: Hot Fudge Kwame Time: Part II

Postby higgs1634 » Fri Jul 17, 2015 1:12 pm

frank - up in grand blanc wrote:
higgs1634 wrote:
D-Day wrote:I wold say good luck with this, but the President just commuted the sentences of 46 felons [ federal prisoners locked up for nonviolent drug offenses] and lectured us all about the collective blessings that will showered down on the country if we just love them more (facepalm). In fact if we just loved our felons more, trickle down economics will actually work. But I digress. So nothing surprises me anymore.......

The scmaltz laid on a little heavy I'll grant you, but these were commutations, not pardons, they weren't absolved of their crime..they're still felons, they just got out early. The issue is when they got sentenced, reactionary sentencing guidelines enacted during a crime wave meant that they and thousands of others are serving prison terms way longer than what they would receive today.

Again, putting aside the politcal smarm of the "they were just making mistakes" for a minute... it's indisputable that non violent drug charges are handled in vastly different ways depending on the wealth or race of the individual. Jamaal selling crack gets a federal stretch...jimmy selling weed up at UM got a ticket.


Is race explicitly at the heart of how we pursue and punish drug offenders? I'm not an expert in this area, but your example could be read to mean that we rate crack as a much more serious problem than marijuana ( again, not an expert, but off-hand I'd agree that crack is bastard of a problem in comparison to weed), thus the penalties are proportionately higher independent of race. The crack trade may be disproportionately black, but unless society deliberately crafts laws to light up drug dealers specifically because they're black then I'm still missing how the law is unfair. I'll concede that there may be an unintended class bias in the doling out of penalties, but if it's true that Trevor gets only a little slap for selling weed to his suite-mates at school then the Huxtable kid (or an Obama daughter or any other real or fictional black middle/upper-class kid) off at school faces the same level of non-punishment for doing what typifies the less onerous drug trade.
I did have an "or"...race or wealth.. in recognition of the situation of Rudy Huxtible getting caught out in Birmingham. but the issue isnt just crack v weed (and why should there be any difference they're both schedule 1? Hash bash should be met with the same level of SWAT response as if it were CRACK BASH) the most disparity shows up in crack v powder coke. The sentencing issues were so bad and affected blacks so disproportionately that in 2010 congress stepped in. the write up from that bill:
In 2010, Congress passed the Fair Sentencing Act (FSA), which reduced the sentencing disparity between offenses for crack and powder cocaine from 100:1 to 18:1. The 100:1 ratio meant that people faced longer sentences for offenses involving crack cocaine than for offenses involving the same amount of powder cocaine – two forms of the same drug. Most disturbingly, because the majority of people arrested for crack offenses are African American, the 100:1 ratio resulted in vast racial disparities in the average length of sentences for comparable offenses. On average, under the 100:1 regime, African Americans served virtually as much time in prison for non-violent drug offenses as whites did for violent offenses. The FSA represents a decade-long, and truly bipartisan, effort to reduce the racial disparities caused by the draconian crack cocaine sentencing laws and to restore confidence in the criminal justice system .
quite a few think the 18:1 is still out of whack.

AA make up 12-13% of the population but are like 40% (someone check that) of the prison population with non violent drug offenses leading all in why they're there. It's some insane stat that 1-4 blacks (again IIRC..someone fact check if you care) will do prison time at some point. it's 1-20 for whites. When it comes to drugs in general, the stats are pretty regularly put out there that White people use and deal way more drugs than AAs (it's just numbers...there are more of us) but are arrested at a far lower rate. Reason being, AAs as a group are poorer and live in urban areas tend to do their using and dealing outside and with strangers whereas white folks tend to use indoors or make their transactions between friends or acquaintances. So, black folks end up arrested and in prison at disproportionately higher numbers.

So no, race is not explicitly at the heart of how we pursue and sentence....its just that black drug offenders are low hanging fruit and the drug war affects them at staggeringly unequal ways.
Last edited by higgs1634 on Fri Jul 17, 2015 1:25 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Hot Fudge Kwame Time: Part II

Postby higgs1634 » Fri Jul 17, 2015 1:15 pm

Amadeus wrote:
frank - up in grand blanc wrote:
higgs1634 wrote:
D-Day wrote:.

However, the claim of racism gets really complicated when you realize that the stiff penalties against crack were supported by the Congressional Black Caucus in the mid-80's. That little nugget of contrary evidence got flushed down the memory hole.

The issue isn't "racism" it's the disparate impact on AAs that resulted. good intentions....bad result. It's not just the crack stuff, it's the three strike/mandatory minimums for repeat offenders that are jacking up the sentencing and having disparate affects.
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