Crap Journalism in the D

About all things in and around the Detroit area

Re: Crap Journalism in the D

Postby Mulligan » Thu May 15, 2014 10:14 pm

The Beav wrote:http://detroit.curbed.com/archives/2014/05/several-corktown-development-efforts-quietly-gain-steam.php
2110 Trumbull: UFO Factory was previously a live music/art venue in Eastern Market. In 2012, the organizers purchased this former liquor store (Hoot Robinson's) right across the street from Tiger Stadium.


Just because the sign says "LIQUOR" doesn't mean it was a store.


Liquor? I don't even know 'er.

X-post to bad jokes.
I used to be with it, but then they changed what 'it' was. Now, what I'm with isn't 'it,' and what's 'it' seems weird and scary.
User avatar
Mulligan
Hot Fudge Parcopresis Sufferer
 
Posts: 5245
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2007 11:32 am
Location: board room

Re: Crap Journalism in the D

Postby frank - up in grand blanc » Wed May 28, 2014 9:57 am

Courtesy of the New Republic

The Onion Has Become America's Finest Marxist News Source

By Emmett Rensin

From coffee shops to college campuses, this country still has plenty of publications dedicated to radical politics. But only one is breathing new life into a far-left movement mostly vanished since FDR dropped dead. It isn’t The Socialist Worker. It’s not The Militant, either. And it isn't Monthly Review, Political Affairs, World Socialist Website, or Worker’s Vanguard. Rather, the vanguard of revolution—the paper most dedicated to the overthrowing capitalism in the United States today—is none other than The Onion.

Since their move to Chicago two years ago, "America’s Finest News Source" has taken on a decidedly darker—and more subversive—bent. Nothing in The Onion suggests explicit support for a communist solution, of course, but looking back on the humor magazine’s punchiest political barbs of late, one can’t help noticing that many of the jokes—what you’re meant to “get”—are just less obtuse, much funnier versions of capitalist critiques in The German Ideology and other Karl Marx classics.

The joke behind “Man Briefly Forgets Hotel Staff are Not Human” would provoke chuckles from even the most crass conservative, but the truth it gets at—that capitalist commodification not just of goods, but of humans' subjective agency in the form of labor, is tantamount to the dehumanization of the working class—is straight out of young Marx’s Manuscripts of 1844. “They’re all so lifelike,” hotel client Peter Adler says in the piece, no doubt contemplating the palpably unnatural material relations of capitalism, “I keep forgetting to just walk right by and act like they’re not even there.”

If only we could all stop forgetting, The Onion seems to cry, then the revolution would be nigh.

It doesn’t stop with the obvious, communist-tinged class warfare gags. More often than not, The Onion delves into deep cuts from the Marx-Engels oeuvre. “Laid Off Man Finally Achieves Perfect Work-Life Balance” has traces of entfremdung, the contention that capitalism alienates the proletariat from their species-consciousness by making them participants without control in the economic relations of their culture. The "newly unemployed" coder can finally eat better, sleep longer, and spend more time with his family! "I'm even cooking more," he says. "Everything just feels right." We laugh because we know that only complete overthrow of the master class and a restoration of “natural” labor relations will give us the balance we seek so fruitlessly in dating sites and cable.

“Majority of Office Supplies Used to Apply for Different Job”, “Interns Treated to Informative 30-Minute Q&A With Totally Miserably Employees”, “Area CEO Likes To Think of Family As Small, Close-Knit Business”—all clear indictments of false consciousness, arising inexorably from bourgeois dogma as it perverts our very understanding of fulfillment, family, and success. Society is sick with capital; attempts to work within the system only lead to comic cycles of futility.

But perhaps the most salient example of The Onion’s Marx-inspired skewering is last months’ “All-Knowing Invisible Hand Of Free Market Once Again Guides Millions In Profits To Nation’s Bead Stores.” The joke is far from subtle. But it wouldn’t be so obviously if you didn’t intuitively buy into the theory of commodity fetishization, and know that the natural use of capital as a convenient common denominator for the exchange of material goods has been supplanted by a system wherein commodities are little more than frivolous intermediates for the conversion of capital into itself. The beads themselves don’t matter! That we assuage this clear perversion of material distribution with mythologies about the “Invisible Hand” and its accompanying capitalist morality play is even more thoroughly Marxist: Stories like these are just post-hoc rationalizations; like all non-materialist philosophy, they seek to rationalize the dominant economic order, not explain it in a real way.

If the idea that this represents some latent Marxism in our culture seems far-fetched, just try imagining a New York Times editorial making the same point: “Seven Figure Profits for Plastic Bead Industry Make the Efficiency and Virtue of Consumer Capitalism Suspect.” Except you can’t imagine that. It’s valid point, but much too radical. It sounds like an Onion headline.

So does “Continued Existence of Cows Disproves Central Tenets of Capitalism.” Except that isn’t from The Onion—it’s a 37-page paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research, exploring why, in India, "livestock investments may persist, even with negative returns." But it quotes, atop its very first page, an Onion piece from which it cribbed its title, "Continued Existence Of Edible Arrangements Disproves Central Tenets Of Capitalism":

In theory, the market should have done away with Edible Arrangements long ago," said American Economic Association president Orley Ashenfelter, who added that one of the crucial assumptions of capitalism is the idea that businesses producing undesired goods or services will fail. "That's how it's supposed to work. Yet somehow, despite offering no product of any worth whatsoever, this company not only makes payroll every week, but also generates strong profits.

See? The real Marxists are catching on.

Of course, you don’t need to have actually read Theories of Surplus Value to “get” the Onion’s jokes. Fans of Preface to The Critique of Political Economy aren’t enjoying some punch line beyond more casual readers’ reach. Rather, the very universal accessibility of The Onion reflects just how deeply ingrained Marxist critiques of capitalism are in our culture. At a time when our moderate president is called a "socialistic dictator" by a sitting congressman, it’s telling that one of our most universally beloved sources of comedy is so sympathetic to a far more radical ideology.

What it tells us is that we’ve accepted Marx’s basic view of capital so thoroughly that we treat it like obvious, intuitive truth—the kind necessary for any kind of broadly appealing humor. The idea that “The Invisible Hand” is a truly stupid way to find moral virtue in our excess consumption of plastic beads is pure Marxism. We’re just not allowed to call it that.

Given this disconnect, it’s unsurprising that withering critiques of American capitalism have found their most popular outlet in the nation's leading satirical newspaper. From King Lear’s Fool to Samuel Clemens, humor is often the cover by which the radical reaches the mainstream. I don't believe The Onion’s writing staff is consciously promoting Marxism, but that only emphasizes the point: Cognitive dissonance or not, Das Kapital has so thoroughly permeated our understanding of capitalism that we’re seldom even aware that we are citing it. It’s become a kind of cultural white noise—always present, but rarely acknowledged.

Among mainstream U.S. publications only The Onion, under the guise of satire, can get away with openly channeling this contradiction. No doubt the intent is more opportunistic than deliberately subversive, but the point remains: With Americans continuing to struggle in the long wake of the Great Recession, and a populist wave taking aim at the country’s ever-widening economic inequality, the timing has never been better for dark humor about the failures of late capitalism. And so The Onion resonates. As the saying goes: It’s funny because it’s true.
User avatar
frank - up in grand blanc
HFD Marketing Consultant or Dumbass
 
Posts: 9163
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2007 8:42 pm
Location: "Avatar repossessed for history of non-payment.."

Re: Crap Journalism in the D

Postby vlad the impaler » Fri Jun 13, 2014 8:58 am

One armed break-in suspect in custody

http://www.livingstondaily.com/article/ ... ct-custody


One armed robber, as in one guy, or one armed robber, as in pics below?

Image

Image
User avatar
vlad the impaler
Highly Appreciated and Valued
 
Posts: 979
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2007 7:57 am
Location: Romania

Re: Crap Journalism in the D

Postby The Suburban Avenger » Thu Jun 26, 2014 8:12 pm

Nolan FInley's channeling his inner Orval Faubus today:
Belle Isle rowdies shift downtown

Warm Saturday nights on Belle Isle used to mean an island-wide, anything-goes party, with booze flowing, music blasting and vehicles lurching along bumper to bumper.
That was last summer. This year, with the conversion of Belle Isle to a state park and troopers sending a forceful message that the party’s over, the island is relatively peaceful on weekend evenings.
But the displaced teens and young adults didn’t disappear. They’re going somewhere else, notably to downtown Detroit, where they’ve triggered alarm among those who are investing and working to make the central city the region’s destination hot spot.
Groups of young people are suddenly roaming the streets, doing what kids too often do — being loud and obnoxious, swearing, fighting and generally making it uncomfortable for people who come downtown for dining and entertainment. Last Saturday, a ridiculous dust-up at a Chene Park rap concert briefly turned the RiverWalk into a battleground.
Those with a stake in downtown understand how fragile its comeback remains. There’s no greater threat than the perception the streets are not safe.
“We understand that,” says Harold Love, the retired Michigan State Police captain who was hired last fall as director of security for the Downtown Detroit Partnership. “With the compliance atmosphere now established on Belle Isle, the crowds are moving. It’s a party crowd, a hang-out crowd, and a lot of it is not appropriate for downtown.”
Love says the various downtown security agencies were caught off-guard by the flood of teens this summer. But he says they are aggressively responding.
“We are following a strategy of changing inappropriate behavior,” he says.
That means strict curfew and parking law enforcement and a greater police presence. After the business community met last fall with Detroit Police Chief James Craig, more resources were shifted downtown.
Along with Detroit cops, the riverfront and downtown are also policed to varying degrees by the state police, Wayne County sheriff, U.S. Customs and private security officers from Quicken Loans, General Motors and other corporations.
The RiverWalk has its own officers, and has nearly every inch of the walkway under video surveillance. The cameras help head off trouble and are speeding arrests when crimes do occur. Several graffiti vandals, for example, have been picked up in the act thanks to the cameras. Downtown, Love says, is “absolutely safe.” He promises it will stay that way.
It isn’t about harassing kids. Belle Isle served as a catch basin for rowdies and revelers, and most people didn’t notice, because they knew enough not to visit the island on a summer Saturday night. Downtown is different. Its success depends on providing a high level of comfort and security to visitors.
And nobody feels comfortable strolling streets filled with rude and raucous kids.


http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20140626/OPINION01/306260003#ixzz35nEZIPHJ


All those raucous kids aren't going downtown, they're going to the Riverwalk, which is free., for the most part. And there are many ways to cut down the flow of people in and out of the area between the RenCen and Jos. Campau ... most notably, cracking down on parking on the vacant lots off Atwater and the other streets between Jefferson and the riverfront. Even early on a Saturday, those lots have filled up pretty quick the last few weekends. A simple "block access to your land if it's not a parking lot" letter to the owner would suffice.
I think it's way too early to tell what effect the entrance fee/heightened enforcement has on visitors to Belle Isle, but if it does, the prospect of paying $10 to park your car and walk to the riverfront might prove just as effective.
My hand to God, she's gonna be at Carnegie Hall. But you - I'll let you have her now at the old price, OK? Which is, which is anything you wanna give me. Anything at all.
User avatar
The Suburban Avenger
HFD Widely Published Freelance Writer
 
Posts: 6702
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2007 1:51 pm
Location: About $8.25 in tolls from Chicago.

Re: Crap Journalism in the D

Postby thunderstruck » Fri Jun 27, 2014 3:43 pm

The Suburban Avenger wrote:Nolan FInley's channeling his inner Orval Faubus today:
Belle Isle rowdies shift downtown

Warm Saturday nights on Belle Isle used to mean an island-wide, anything-goes party, with booze flowing, music blasting and vehicles lurching along bumper to bumper.
That was last summer. This year, with the conversion of Belle Isle to a state park and troopers sending a forceful message that the party’s over, the island is relatively peaceful on weekend evenings.
But the displaced teens and young adults didn’t disappear. They’re going somewhere else, notably to downtown Detroit, where they’ve triggered alarm among those who are investing and working to make the central city the region’s destination hot spot.
Groups of young people are suddenly roaming the streets, doing what kids too often do — being loud and obnoxious, swearing, fighting and generally making it uncomfortable for people who come downtown for dining and entertainment. Last Saturday, a ridiculous dust-up at a Chene Park rap concert briefly turned the RiverWalk into a battleground.
Those with a stake in downtown understand how fragile its comeback remains. There’s no greater threat than the perception the streets are not safe.
“We understand that,” says Harold Love, the retired Michigan State Police captain who was hired last fall as director of security for the Downtown Detroit Partnership. “With the compliance atmosphere now established on Belle Isle, the crowds are moving. It’s a party crowd, a hang-out crowd, and a lot of it is not appropriate for downtown.”
Love says the various downtown security agencies were caught off-guard by the flood of teens this summer. But he says they are aggressively responding.
“We are following a strategy of changing inappropriate behavior,” he says.
That means strict curfew and parking law enforcement and a greater police presence. After the business community met last fall with Detroit Police Chief James Craig, more resources were shifted downtown.
Along with Detroit cops, the riverfront and downtown are also policed to varying degrees by the state police, Wayne County sheriff, U.S. Customs and private security officers from Quicken Loans, General Motors and other corporations.
The RiverWalk has its own officers, and has nearly every inch of the walkway under video surveillance. The cameras help head off trouble and are speeding arrests when crimes do occur. Several graffiti vandals, for example, have been picked up in the act thanks to the cameras. Downtown, Love says, is “absolutely safe.” He promises it will stay that way.
It isn’t about harassing kids. Belle Isle served as a catch basin for rowdies and revelers, and most people didn’t notice, because they knew enough not to visit the island on a summer Saturday night. Downtown is different. Its success depends on providing a high level of comfort and security to visitors.
And nobody feels comfortable strolling streets filled with rude and raucous kids.


http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20140626/OPINION01/306260003#ixzz35nEZIPHJ


All those raucous kids aren't going downtown, they're going to the Riverwalk, which is free., for the most part. And there are many ways to cut down the flow of people in and out of the area between the RenCen and Jos. Campau ... most notably, cracking down on parking on the vacant lots off Atwater and the other streets between Jefferson and the riverfront. Even early on a Saturday, those lots have filled up pretty quick the last few weekends. A simple "block access to your land if it's not a parking lot" letter to the owner would suffice.
I think it's way too early to tell what effect the entrance fee/heightened enforcement has on visitors to Belle Isle, but if it does, the prospect of paying $10 to park your car and walk to the riverfront might prove just as effective.

So Finely's a Little Rock-type segregationist racist for noticing that the rowdies moved their base of operations from BI to downtown/Riverwalk, and for thinking that it might harm the ambiance and the "comeback" downtown? Guess I'm a flaming racist too, because I'm happy to see a stepped up no-bullshit policy downtown. If youngish people want to hang out downtown that's fine. If anyone, young, old, black or white wants to act like an ass then I'm glad the heavy hand of the law is there to keep it in check.

Also, I guess I don't get the hostility to Finley's column followed by your suggestion that they price all the young folks out of downtown by charging $10 to park. That's a better and more just solution than simply increasing the enforcement of law so that the public of any age or shade can enjoy a peaceful time downtown?
User avatar
thunderstruck
Hot Fudge Regular
 
Posts: 1195
Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2007 9:01 pm
Location: Beyond comprehension

Re: Crap Journalism in the D

Postby guest » Fri Jun 27, 2014 4:40 pm

Detroit curfew rule misses problem


an overplayed baseball pitcher as an allegory for an allegedly misguided curfew policy, huh?

http://www.detroitnews.com/article/2014 ... /306270014
User avatar
guest
Hot Fudge Poor Dentition
 
Posts: 6632
Joined: Wed Mar 28, 2007 11:40 am
Location: the old windmill

Re: Crap Journalism in the D

Postby middle aged female » Fri Jun 27, 2014 4:53 pm

guest wrote:
Detroit curfew rule misses problem


an overplayed baseball pitcher as an allegory for an allegedly misguided curfew policy, huh?

http://www.detroitnews.com/article/2014 ... /306270014

From the news report I saw on, I think, Channel 2 the next morning, the parents were all find fifty bucks to get their kid back. And even if they didn't charge them to spring them, the parents still had to go get them, so that at the least was an incentive to smack your kid upside the head for making you go out.
User avatar
middle aged female
Hot Fudge Designated Driver
 
Posts: 7394
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2008 9:22 am

Re: Crap Journalism in the D

Postby thunderstruck » Sat Jun 28, 2014 12:02 pm

I read a couple news reports that said the parents were fined $50. Sounds like the op-ed writer from Portland missed the news.
User avatar
thunderstruck
Hot Fudge Regular
 
Posts: 1195
Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2007 9:01 pm
Location: Beyond comprehension

Re: Crap Journalism in the D

Postby guest » Sat Jun 28, 2014 4:21 pm

thunderstruck wrote: ...the parents were fined $50.


$50, or about 1/3 of what they'd spend on a pair of sneakers for the little thugs
User avatar
guest
Hot Fudge Poor Dentition
 
Posts: 6632
Joined: Wed Mar 28, 2007 11:40 am
Location: the old windmill

Re: Crap Journalism in the D

Postby guest » Tue Jul 22, 2014 8:53 am

Grosse Pointe continues to dither over whether or not its library will continue to distribute the MetroTimes.
After hearing concerns raised by residents who demanded the city remove Metro Times outboxes because of the tabloid’s sexually explicit ads, the Grosse Pointe City Council said it plans to have its attorneys do a cursory review to see whether it can consider a ban.


...the Grosse Pointe Library Board, facing half a dozen critics of the tabloid, considered a ban, then voted 7-0 in June to stack the Metro Times out of sight.


http://www.freep.com/article/20140722/N ... mes-covers

I'm not seeing how the library is obligated to carry a stack of a newsprint weekly full of ads. If the purpose of a library is to provide for borrowing, browsing and research materials, how does distributing MT fit? I'd argue that it doesn't.
User avatar
guest
Hot Fudge Poor Dentition
 
Posts: 6632
Joined: Wed Mar 28, 2007 11:40 am
Location: the old windmill

Re: Crap Journalism in the D

Postby Stosh Kielbasa » Tue Jul 22, 2014 7:38 pm

guest wrote:Grosse Pointe continues to dither over whether or not its library will continue to distribute the MetroTimes.
After hearing concerns raised by residents who demanded the city remove Metro Times outboxes because of the tabloid’s sexually explicit ads, the Grosse Pointe City Council said it plans to have its attorneys do a cursory review to see whether it can consider a ban.


...the Grosse Pointe Library Board, facing half a dozen critics of the tabloid, considered a ban, then voted 7-0 in June to stack the Metro Times out of sight.


http://www.freep.com/article/20140722/N ... mes-covers

I'm not seeing how the library is obligated to carry a stack of a newsprint weekly full of ads. If the purpose of a library is to provide for borrowing, browsing and research materials, how does distributing MT fit? I'd argue that it doesn't.


Providing a newspaper, no matter what paper it is, is a function of the Director of the Library. There are lots of periodicals that they don't carry, BY CHOICE. Also, the exact location and availability of materials within the library is often restricted, by age as well as other factors such as rarity and age.

The MT could be stacked outside with a rock on top, and you could call it access. Same as behind the counter.
Niech żyje reinkarnacja!
User avatar
Stosh Kielbasa
Hot Fudge Regular
 
Posts: 278
Joined: Sat Jul 25, 2009 9:36 am

Re: Crap Journalism in the D

Postby MICHIGAN » Tue Jul 22, 2014 9:29 pm

Stosh Kielbasa wrote:
guest wrote:Grosse Pointe continues to dither over whether or not its library will continue to distribute the MetroTimes.
After hearing concerns raised by residents who demanded the city remove Metro Times outboxes because of the tabloid’s sexually explicit ads, the Grosse Pointe City Council said it plans to have its attorneys do a cursory review to see whether it can consider a ban.


...the Grosse Pointe Library Board, facing half a dozen critics of the tabloid, considered a ban, then voted 7-0 in June to stack the Metro Times out of sight.


http://www.freep.com/article/20140722/N ... mes-covers

I'm not seeing how the library is obligated to carry a stack of a newsprint weekly full of ads. If the purpose of a library is to provide for borrowing, browsing and research materials, how does distributing MT fit? I'd argue that it doesn't.


Providing a newspaper, no matter what paper it is, is a function of the Director of the Library. There are lots of periodicals that they don't carry, BY CHOICE. Also, the exact location and availability of materials within the library is often restricted, by age as well as other factors such as rarity and age.

The MT could be stacked outside with a rock on top, and you could call it access. Same as behind the counter.


Wait, what is the crap in this scenario- The MT, The Freep, or all of the above?
Santa Cleopatra
User avatar
MICHIGAN
Hot Fudge Board Game Builder
 
Posts: 4690
Joined: Thu Sep 06, 2007 11:33 am
Location: Teatro Massimo

Re: Crap Journalism in the D

Postby middle aged female » Wed Aug 27, 2014 3:57 pm

I'm really sorry the girl is missing but come on, Freep:

Detroit police seek missing Storm Yvette Bolding, 16

Posted: Aug 26, 2014 10:42 AM EDT
Updated: Aug 26, 2014 10:43 AM EDT
By myFOXDetroit.com Staff - email


DETROIT (WJBK) - The Detroit Police Department is asking for the public's assistance in locating 16-year-old Storm Yvette Bolding, who was last seen August 18, 2014.

Storm was last seen by her mother than day in the 15,000 block of Manning around 2:30 p.m. That block is near the intersection of E. State Fair Avenue and Hayes Street on the city's east side.
User avatar
middle aged female
Hot Fudge Designated Driver
 
Posts: 7394
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2008 9:22 am

Re: Crap Journalism in the D

Postby guest » Tue Sep 16, 2014 10:27 am

The Freep redesigned their web page. It looks like something you'd give a child and, oh, yeah right, never mind.
User avatar
guest
Hot Fudge Poor Dentition
 
Posts: 6632
Joined: Wed Mar 28, 2007 11:40 am
Location: the old windmill

Re: Crap Journalism in the D

Postby Amadeus » Tue Sep 16, 2014 10:39 am

I choose this paragraph as representative for an article in today's Macomb Daily. No editors were available for the reporter, I guess.

The subject is widening North Avenue from Hall Road to 21 Mile Road, which of course brought out significant opposition. The only good point against it is that 21 Mile needs work before North Avenue.

“A firm was hired, an engineering firm, was hired to model this roadway based on the traffic counts at the peak hours, a.m. and p.m.,” Crumm said. “Based on that... delay in making left hand turns into the minor roads, we didn’t look at driveways, we looked at minor roads, would be considerable. Until you get to the five lane, which then brings it down to what we were talking about, level of services... And then what we did is they projected out, based on the lane uses around here, the zoning that Macomb Township has and the current subdivisions that are in development or have different parcels. We took that out to 2034 and basically each lane use... They do studies and they figure out a residential has this many trips and a bank has this many, and so they add those all up they take them out. And we used one and a half percent growth rate for every year, which is what the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments has reported for this area. And out in 2034 there would be estimated over 26,000 trips a day. And so then we take that 26,000 trips and we determine what does it take to get those through that mile both in flow and in safety.”


The rest of the article is no better. The reporter must have used some kind of automatic transcription app, but I don't understand why she just plunked the text in there.

http://www.macombdaily.com/government-a ... opposition
“We have 25 years or so invested in the work. Why should I make the data available to you when your aim is to try and find something wrong with it?” Phil Jones, 2005
User avatar
Amadeus
Hot Fudge Humanitarian
 
Posts: 2628
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2007 3:04 pm

PreviousNext

Return to General Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 4 guests