Detroit Radio

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Re: Detroit Radio

Postby Mad Max » Wed Apr 27, 2016 11:42 pm

middle aged female wrote:
Mud Bug wrote:I agree 100%. They will banter about the usual topics- politics, pop culture, porn stars, college football and call an occasional D list celeb but it won't be the same as live air.

Occasionally, when I stop by the Drew and Mike dot org website and listen to an archived show from, say 2004, it makes me appreciate the long run they had all the more.

Also, I'm a little surprised they are reuniting, especially since there is no contract involved. If you were paying attention when Drew got the 105.1 afternoon show minus Mike, there was quite a few subtle and not-so-subtle jabs from both camps.

I find the same problem with listening to DJs that left the time/area. Diminski and Doyle were my favorite afternoon drive time team for a long time on 97.1; then they went all sports.
D&D moved to morning drive on CSX and they majorly sucked; different energy between morning and afternoon banter and CSX made them play music interspersed with their chat. Didn't last.
Next, I found out they moved back to afternoon drive but in New Jersey. I can easily pick them up on Iphone or PC at 3pm and listen, but their topicallity just isn't the same; it's like they're not talking to ME anymore.
Have never found a real replacement. Sirius radio has to do now


Adam Carolla's podcast is able to get live call-ins. They put the word out on twitter that now is the time to call, and some lackey does the usually screening before putting them on. Although his audience isn't limited to one region.

Drew and Mike's former minions still have their Detroit Cast podcast going.
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Re: Detroit Radio

Postby Mud Bug » Thu Apr 28, 2016 3:26 pm

Mad Max wrote:Drew and Mike's former minions still have their Detroit Cast podcast going.


Amazingly, given how they probably haven't made two nickels with that.

You can hear Mike Wolter's voice crack when he says he would love to be part of the new D&M gig--

http://www.drewandmike.org
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Re: Detroit Radio

Postby frank - up in grand blanc » Sat Oct 15, 2016 7:52 pm

Just heard part of the recast Garrison Keilor-less Prairie Home Companion and I'm somewhere between meh and uh-oh. I wasn't a big fan of the original but my mother sure was (is) so it was frequently on at home, thus I can lay claim to it's folksy bullshit being a part of the audio backdrop of my youth. Thinking now: what, 35 or 40 years of off and on listening? Yeah, probably.

in case you missed it Garrison Keilor retired and public radio lovers and small college town cultural snobs collectively shat their pants: what could possibly replace the institution thay was GK? The answer is some mid-30s mandolin virtuoso who, per what i heard, has the same irritating pretentiousness of GK. On the plus side he brought on Jack White, but he didnt tear it up with Hotel Yorba but instead plucked some insipid bull on his own mandolin. So, new guy who is a close study of the old but who is trying liven things up and (per Rolling Stone interview ) satisfy his bosses' objective and freshen the audience while keeping the old (average age is 59, or approximately the age of Lowell's copy of Howl)). Know what come a to mind after hearing part of the show and the non-response from the audience? Bill Knapps. The younger folk won't come and the older folk will crab about how their old-time favorite was junked up with glitz and glam.
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Re: Detroit Radio

Postby middle aged female » Sun Oct 16, 2016 9:07 am

frank - up in grand blanc wrote:Just heard part of the recast Garrison Keilor-less Prairie Home Companion and I'm somewhere between meh and uh-oh. I wasn't a big fan of the original but my mother sure was (is) so it was frequently on at home, thus I can lay claim to it's folksy bullshit being a part of the audio backdrop of my youth. Thinking now: what, 35 or 40 years of off and on listening? Yeah, probably.

in case you missed it Garrison Keilor retired and public radio lovers and small college town cultural snobs collectively shat their pants: what could possibly replace the institution thay was GK? The answer is some mid-30s mandolin virtuoso who, per what i heard, has the same irritating pretentiousness of GK. On the plus side he brought on Jack White, but he didnt tear it up with Hotel Yorba but instead plucked some insipid bull on his own mandolin. So, new guy who is a close study of the old but who is trying liven things up and (per Rolling Stone interview ) satisfy his bosses' objective and freshen the audience while keeping the old (average age is 59, or approximately the age of Lowell's copy of Howl)). Know what come a to mind after hearing part of the show and the non-response from the audience? Bill Knapps. The younger folk won't come and the older folk will crab about how their old-time favorite was junked up with glitz and glam.

I'll just bet it will be an ironic hit among the hipsters.
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Re: Detroit Radio

Postby frank - up in grand blanc » Sun Oct 16, 2016 10:06 am

[/quote]
I'll just bet it will be an ironic hit among the hipsters.[/quote]

Maybe, but they're he core of that show is like Fiber McGee's closet: the first 500 times they did a Powdermilk Biscuits "commercial" it could raise a least a shadow of a smile, but holy shit everything that the do has been done again since at least the Carter administration. My prediction is, hip musical guests notwithstanding, the recast show will generate as much affection with the hipsters as a Bic or Gillette.
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Re: Detroit Radio

Postby Mud Bug » Sun Oct 16, 2016 10:52 am

For a good half of the 1990s, I lived in the high-desert part of Oregon, just north of Nevada and west of Idaho. Population density of .7 persons per square mile, there were more rattlesnakes that people. When it came to radio (this is the pre-SiriusXM era, mind you), I had four choices on the dial: AM gold out of Boise (heavy on Gordon Lightfoot and Neil Diamond), piped in Christian music on the FM, a local AM country western station, and public radio on the FM.

Over time, NPR became the default channel and Prairie Home Companion become part of my weekends. The silly skits with dusty cowboys or crime noir detectives, the made up news about people named Sven and Ollie, the ubiquitous puns tinged with adolescent humor, etc.

I moved away when satellite radio arrived and never listened to another episode.
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Re: Detroit Radio

Postby frank - up in grand blanc » Sun Oct 16, 2016 11:44 am

Mud Bug wrote:For a good half of the 1990s, I lived in the high-desert part of Oregon, just north of Nevada and west of Idaho. Population density of .7 persons per square mile, there were more rattlesnakes that people. When it came to radio (this is the pre-SiriusXM era, mind you), I had four choices on the dial: AM gold out of Boise (heavy on Gordon Lightfoot and Neil Diamond), piped in Christian music on the FM, a local AM country western station, and public radio on the FM.

Over time, NPR became the default channel and Prairie Home Companion become part of my weekends. The silly skits with dusty cowboys or crime noir detectives, the made up news about people named Sven and Ollie, the ubiquitous puns tinged with adolescent humor, etc.

I moved away when satellite radio arrived and never listened to another episode.


So which of those four carried the farm report ("sand futures are up on reports of rain in Saudi Arabia...") and who covered local high school sports?

When we moved north I found a local AM station that, among other things, had live home coverage of the CHL hockey team and a weekly call-in program called Race Talk covering racers and racing at the three local time asks (Flint, Owosso, and Birch Run). Sounds hokey and it was, but I found myself tuning in even though everything else available in Detroit or over the satellite was available: it was a connection to my new home and it was an immersion into the people and places that were otherwise strange. So I'm a fan of what's on the local dial.
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Re: Detroit Radio

Postby middle aged female » Sun Oct 16, 2016 2:26 pm

frank - up in grand blanc wrote:
Mud Bug wrote:For a good half of the 1990s, I lived in the high-desert part of Oregon, just north of Nevada and west of Idaho. Population density of .7 persons per square mile, there were more rattlesnakes that people. When it came to radio (this is the pre-SiriusXM era, mind you), I had four choices on the dial: AM gold out of Boise (heavy on Gordon Lightfoot and Neil Diamond), piped in Christian music on the FM, a local AM country western station, and public radio on the FM.

Over time, NPR became the default channel and Prairie Home Companion become part of my weekends. The silly skits with dusty cowboys or crime noir detectives, the made up news about people named Sven and Ollie, the ubiquitous puns tinged with adolescent humor, etc.

I moved away when satellite radio arrived and never listened to another episode.


So which of those four carried the farm report ("sand futures are up on reports of rain in Saudi Arabia...") and who covered local high school sports?

When we moved north I found a local AM station that, among other things, had live home coverage of the CHL hockey team and a weekly call-in program called Race Talk covering racers and racing at the three local time asks (Flint, Owosso, and Birch Run). Sounds hokey and it was, but I found myself tuning in even though everything else available in Detroit or over the satellite was available: it was a connection to my new home and it was an immersion into the people and places that were otherwise strange. So I'm a fan of what's on the local dial.

If it's like Lapeer County was in the 70'/80's, it was the AM station. Early mornings on Lapeer WMPC you got the farm report followed closely by the county wide crime report which consisted of tidbits like "Chief Ross Reynolds of Dryden reports that at 6:53 am Jenny Wilson of 123 Mill Rd heard garbage cans rattling and called the police. Cause was raccoon mother and babies." "Lapeer County sheriffs investigated a noise report at General Squire Park. Several teenagers were loudly playing car radios. They were dispersed"
Very enlightening about the hard lives of rural cops in mid-century America.
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Re: Detroit Radio

Postby Mud Bug » Sun Oct 16, 2016 2:43 pm

frank - up in grand blanc wrote:So which of those four carried the farm report ("sand futures are up on reports of rain in Saudi Arabia...") and who covered local high school sports?

When we moved north I found a local AM station that, among other things, had live home coverage of the CHL hockey team and a weekly call-in program called Race Talk covering racers and racing at the three local time asks (Flint, Owosso, and Birch Run). Sounds hokey and it was, but I found myself tuning in even though everything else available in Detroit or over the satellite was available: it was a connection to my new home and it was an immersion into the people and places that were otherwise strange. So I'm a fan of what's on the local dial.


frank - up in grand blanc wrote:
So which of those four carried the farm report ("sand futures are up on reports of rain in Saudi Arabia...") and who covered local high school sports?

When we moved north I found a local AM station that, among other things, had live home coverage of the CHL hockey team and a weekly call-in program called Race Talk covering racers and racing at the three local time asks (Flint, Owosso, and Birch Run). Sounds hokey and it was, but I found myself tuning in even though everything else available in Detroit or over the satellite was available: it was a connection to my new home and it was an immersion into the people and places that were otherwise strange. So I'm a fan of what's on the local dial.


The station was KZZR, Burns, Oregon, aka "The Voice of No Choice". It died a few years ago, thanks in part to SiriusXM, no doubt. I've heard there's a local group trying to raise money to resurrect the station, but it would be an act of love without any financial reward, akin to the guys who broadcast their own podcasts from their basements every day, knowing full well that only a handful of listeners are out there and they'll never see real dollars from their efforts (see Detroitcast).

An average broadcast day went like this: a light-hearted morning show with two guys starting at 7am; one would read the news of the day and the other would pipe in with dumb jokes and in-offensive commentary. Imagine Drew and Mike except two dull monotone voices, no funny drops, and G-rated humor. Add in stockyard reports on beef prices, alfalfa and hay forecasts, missing dog alerts, and a daily 'shop and swap' segment where callers would offer their wares and services (Howard Stern would've had a field day calling in 'twelve chrome dildos for sale, slightly used and yellowed, various shapes and sizes', and the hosts not having a clue).

They would also read birthdays, anniversaries, and general community announcements, such as, "this Friday, the Cattlewomen's Association is having their annual ball at the Elks club. Admission is $20 per couple and includes a prime rib buffet and cowboy and cowgirl dancing." The in-house commercials were the same voices as the morning guys, but often they would add an echo effect, I guess to make it sound special. After the morning show ended, the rest of the day would be old school country-western songs and hourly news and weather updates. At 11pm, the station signed off and it was static for the night.

The station would live broadcast football and basketball games. High school sports and Friday Nights Lights were huge. Towards the end of my tenure there, the little football team that could won state champs and the star QB went on to play at Oregon. He continued on to the NFL and plays for San Diego now (Kellen Clemens).

Monday mornings were my favorite because they read the jail roster from over the weekend. Because there was an Indian res nearby, and because cowboys have a tendency to blow entire paychecks on whiskey and women, there was always a fresh class of new inmates by Sunday morning. Being a small town, they were usually someone known to you; maybe they had sold you a couple of cord of firewood in the past, maybe they had hit a cow the highway and you were the first one to roll up and help butcher it.

Like much of Americana from the past 100 years, local AM radio is a dying institution, just like the mom and pop shops and small town newspapers and all the other fibers that comprised the social fabric of rural life. Facebook has largely replaced local radio as the primary conduit of information and opinion, and that's not good as the discourse is what we all know social media to be: mostly bad information, uniformed opinion, petty sniping, and people like Chuck controlling the narrative. I suspect the consequences of modernization have yet to be fully realized, but just like when water got piped into an African village in the name of progress and destroyed the matriarchal hierarchy that no longer met at the village well, it won't be good.
Last edited by Mud Bug on Sun Oct 16, 2016 3:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Detroit Radio

Postby Mud Bug » Sun Oct 16, 2016 3:23 pm

Back to the topic at hand: the new Prairie Home Companion.

I caught part of the first hour today, driving back from getting groceries.

The new host, Chris Thile, was obviously hand-picked by Garrison Keillor to carry on the legacy. As he spoke, I imagined him looking like a Garrison Keillor Mini Me (I remember him playing mandolin on the show back in 1997, btw).

Having Jack White and his tattooed and mohawked female violinist as the first musical guest sent a clear message: no more Molasses Creek or Squirrel Nut Zippers. Folk Generation X is here. Get used to it.

https://youtu.be/5OytpK-sN40
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Re: Detroit Radio

Postby frank - up in grand blanc » Mon Oct 17, 2016 11:04 am

It's really interesting to note how mass media have changed in the course of recent memory. The ad industry has been revolutionized at least twice in our lifetimes and where and how billions (yeah, billions, right here in Detroit, and then many more billions around the world) are spent has blown up industry titans. Old-line ad agencies have shrunk or gone completely under and consequently really f-ed with the livelihood and retirements of yesterday's "mad men."

But the social changes of technology and media consumption habits are, IMO, bigger than everything else wrought by mobile devices and the interwebs. If nothing else the limited number of local options forced the majority of us to be more or less on the same page in terms of news and entertainment. Way, way back when my circle would pepper conversation with character voices, jokes, and other references from the top-rated local morning radio hosts, like JJ & the Morning Crew. There were only so many options, you know, and so while there was a limited ranged of what was available to see, hear, and read it felt as though there was a cultural and informational unity that by comparison today is much diminished. Hooray for self-directed media because it allows me to hear and read things that are too narrow (and monetize) for the classic media behomeths, but while we're jamming to death metal or scanning blogs the common threads that gave relevance to a line like "the boogin' mansion" are lost and people slip from being neighbors to strangers. This is an interesting state of affairs; not necessarily time for hand-wringing, but interesting to observe and live through it.

Hey, WLEW, 102.1 FM out of Bad Axe is a station along the lines of Mud Bug's tale. They're not so folksy as to read from the crime blotter, but the jocks run eight-hour shifts and the commercials and local news sound like they're lifted from a time long ago. I can pick them up on the car radio while running errands, and if you're running across I-69 or heading up to Caseville for some beach time you should lend them your ear.
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