Dead Celebrities

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Re: Dead Celebrities

Postby Morty » Wed Feb 08, 2017 11:16 pm

Professor Irwin Corey died at age 100. Cross-post to celebrities I didn't know were still alive.


https://www.yahoo.com/news/comedian-irw ... rc=fauxdal
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Re: Dead Celebrities

Postby middle aged female » Fri Feb 10, 2017 7:39 pm

Mr Ilitch has died at age 87 without the World Series Banner he wanted so badly. May he rest in peace.
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Re: Dead Celebrities

Postby middle aged female » Sun Feb 12, 2017 3:30 pm

Al Jarreau has died at age 76. His self-title album, Jarreau, was on of my all time favorites
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Re: Dead Celebrities

Postby The Suburban Avenger » Mon Feb 13, 2017 10:19 am

middle aged female wrote:Mr Ilitch has died at age 87 without the World Series Banner he wanted so badly. May he rest in peace.


I see they're having him laid out (or just a memorial, not sure) in front of Comerica Park today. Mourners can leave gravel from one of his parking lots to let everyone else know they were there.
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Re: Dead Celebrities

Postby middle aged female » Mon Feb 13, 2017 10:56 am

The Suburban Avenger wrote:
middle aged female wrote:Mr Ilitch has died at age 87 without the World Series Banner he wanted so badly. May he rest in peace.


I see they're having him laid out (or just a memorial, not sure) in front of Comerica Park today. Mourners can leave gravel from one of his parking lots to let everyone else know they were there.

Actually, the memorial will be at the Fox Theater that he restored.
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Re: Dead Celebrities

Postby Morty » Mon Feb 13, 2017 4:18 pm

middle aged female wrote:
The Suburban Avenger wrote:
middle aged female wrote:Mr Ilitch has died at age 87 without the World Series Banner he wanted so badly. May he rest in peace.


I see they're having him laid out (or just a memorial, not sure) in front of Comerica Park today. Mourners can leave gravel from one of his parking lots to let everyone else know they were there.

Actually, the memorial will be at the Fox Theater that he restored.


In the mid 1970s I was part of a group of young people who were fixated on these old places, and we saw a lot of potential in the Fox. It was at that time the go-to place for your Bruce Lee Chop-socky entertainment, also your blatant Blacksplotation features like "BLackula" and "Coffey" or any Pam Grier opus. The clientele didn't treat the place as anything special, the main floor reeked of urine, the bathrooms were so far away it was just easier to piss on the floor. The guy running the place was at one time an usher, who was promoted to third assistant night manager, then to night manager, then through attrition finally manager. He was kept in this job by fellow Fox usher-turned Hollywood "C" grade Drive-In movie producer Herman Cohen, the money behind the operation of the Fox in these years.
We would go in from midnight until 7 AM and fix things, patch the roof (never really fixed leaks, we just moved them from one place to another) we took rampant advantage of Detroit Edison's free bulb exchange, re-lighting vast portions of that building that had slowly gone dark as the bulbs went out and there was no will or staff to replace them. We lowered the huge ball chandelier and vacuumed 1/2" of dust off of it and we completely re-lamped it, through the generosity of Detroit Edison. We fixed the sump pumps in the sub basements so that they didn't fill with sewage. Later on (1978 or so) things started to disappear. One of our guys found a set of those V-shaped wall sconces in an antique shop in Lansing. He told the proprietor they were stolen property and got them down to pretty cheap, he bought them and we returned them. We went around and put special fasteners on all the light fixtures, ones that required a unique tool to undo, we cross-drilled the huge threaded knobs on the bottoms of the hanging fixtures that hang in the balcony levels. All the theft stopped after that. We formed a 501 C-3 to (maybe) take the place over if the current regime was ousted, when that happened the owners put a slightly better operator in place. We were always around the place through the next two operators, and things were better, but still, not living up to the potential of the place.
Enter the Ilitch organization. For the first time in our lives there was a plan, and money to make the plan happen. A lit of things were done, and done right. I remember in November of 1988, standing on one of the upper level balconies, watching elegantly dressed ladies and men arriving for "The Ultimate Event", Sammy, Liza and Frank. The place no longer was dingy and dank, it smelled of fresh paint, not urine. It was the payoff for what we believed in, and were foolish enough to stay up all night, working for free in some out-of-state owner's building, hoping for a better day for a fantastic place. Mike Ilitch made that day happen. It was a very emotionally fulfilling moment.
The vacant lot at 12 mile and Drake roads where the new Little Caesars world HQ building was to go is still vacant--my kids played soccer there, courtesy of Little Caesar's. I hear you about the parking lots, and unfortunately, that's Detroit as much as it is Ilitch.
I hear all the bitching about public tax money going to build his stadium and arena--not my idea of right, but enough other people's idea that it happened, twice. People are pretty blinded by their love of sports, they'll cut a pass on this in order to watch their beloved team play. Were the city to go to the people and ask for that kind of money for something related to the arts it would be a big, fat "fuck no", those same sports fans subsidizing the stadia are the ones who were screaming "sell all the (DIA) art" during the bankruptcy.
I guess he knew how to get what he wanted for his teams and for his businesses.

I admire the man.

Rest in peace Mike.
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Re: Dead Celebrities

Postby The Suburban Avenger » Mon Feb 13, 2017 4:57 pm

Morty wrote:I hear you about the parking lots, and unfortunately, that's Detroit as much as it is Ilitch.
I hear all the bitching about public tax money going to build his stadium and arena--not my idea of right, but enough other people's idea that it happened, twice. People are pretty blinded by their love of sports, they'll cut a pass on this in order to watch their beloved team play. Were the city to go to the people and ask for that kind of money for something related to the arts it would be a big, fat "fuck no", those same sports fans subsidizing the stadia are the ones who were screaming "sell all the (DIA) art" during the bankruptcy.
I guess he knew how to get what he wanted for his teams and for his businesses.

I admire the man.

Rest in peace Mike.


I couldn't agree with you more.
The 'getting what you want' part, however, should be just as much a part of the story without tears.
There's a lot to admire about the guy. Building a pizza place into a national corporation takes an amazing amount of hustle and involvement. Every city has a pizza joint, so think of what it took to get a mass-market one into that city and thrive (the downside of the $5 pizza, however, is that franchises struggle to make money off it. A small business lending site figured 2013 sales per location at $460K but the cost of operating a franchise varied from the high $200K to mid-$600K -- the profit on a Hot N Ready pizza is about 90 cents).
The Fox Theatre project was noble. Like so many others have said, he took a chance when few others wanted to and it paid off in spades. Good for him.
But the story doesn't and shouldn't end there. Nothing he did in the city was 'for' the city; it was for him. And his organization was hardly crazy about footing the bill for ancillary things like police overtime to direct traffic at events (even if they're reserve officers, that's resources and manpower that can be better applied in a city so large) or paying the lease/penalties/share of revenue from Joe Louis Arena. The $10 million in back taxes and broadcast fees might just have gone into the general fund black hole, but it was money the organization owed the city ... and it had to be nudged more than gently to pay up.
All revenue from the new arena will go to Olympia despite the fact Olympia will pay about 40 percent of the cost to erect the building. That's a double whammy when TIF funds meant for schools were used to finance most of its construction.
A former Freep sportswriter who now works for Fox Sports tweeted that Ilitch influenced the city to a degree unseen before. That's complete bullshit. Like you said, Morty, Ilitch and his organization were very good when it came to getting what they wanted, and most of the time, they got what they wanted because the city was too inept or scared or leadership-poor to tell Olympia no. The parking lots and the buildings that were left to go to seed, like you said, were part of that.

He was a self-made man back when America still cared more about how you earned your money than whether you had it. That's a helluva life.
Still, the footprint he's left in Detroit likely won't benefit the city -- and most of its inhabitants -- in the decades to come.
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Re: Dead Celebrities

Postby Morty » Mon Feb 13, 2017 5:26 pm

The Suburban Avenger wrote:
Morty wrote:I hear you about the parking lots, and unfortunately, that's Detroit as much as it is Ilitch.
I hear all the bitching about public tax money going to build his stadium and arena--not my idea of right, but enough other people's idea that it happened, twice. People are pretty blinded by their love of sports, they'll cut a pass on this in order to watch their beloved team play. Were the city to go to the people and ask for that kind of money for something related to the arts it would be a big, fat "fuck no", those same sports fans subsidizing the stadia are the ones who were screaming "sell all the (DIA) art" during the bankruptcy.
I guess he knew how to get what he wanted for his teams and for his businesses.

I admire the man.

Rest in peace Mike.


I couldn't agree with you more.
The 'getting what you want' part, however, should be just as much a part of the story without tears.
There's a lot to admire about the guy. Building a pizza place into a national corporation takes an amazing amount of hustle and involvement. Every city has a pizza joint, so think of what it took to get a mass-market one into that city and thrive (the downside of the $5 pizza, however, is that franchises struggle to make money off it. A small business lending site figured 2013 sales per location at $460K but the cost of operating a franchise varied from the high $200K to mid-$600K -- the profit on a Hot N Ready pizza is about 90 cents).
The Fox Theatre project was noble. Like so many others have said, he took a chance when few others wanted to and it paid off in spades. Good for him.
But the story doesn't and shouldn't end there. Nothing he did in the city was 'for' the city; it was for him. And his organization was hardly crazy about footing the bill for ancillary things like police overtime to direct traffic at events (even if they're reserve officers, that's resources and manpower that can be better applied in a city so large) or paying the lease/penalties/share of revenue from Joe Louis Arena. The $10 million in back taxes and broadcast fees might just have gone into the general fund black hole, but it was money the organization owed the city ... and it had to be nudged more than gently to pay up.
All revenue from the new arena will go to Olympia despite the fact Olympia will pay about 40 percent of the cost to erect the building. That's a double whammy when TIF funds meant for schools were used to finance most of its construction.
A former Freep sportswriter who now works for Fox Sports tweeted that Ilitch influenced the city to a degree unseen before. That's complete bullshit. Like you said, Morty, Ilitch and his organization were very good when it came to getting what they wanted, and most of the time, they got what they wanted because the city was too inept or scared or leadership-poor to tell Olympia no. The parking lots and the buildings that were left to go to seed, like you said, were part of that.

He was a self-made man back when America still cared more about how you earned your money than whether you had it. That's a helluva life.
Still, the footprint he's left in Detroit likely won't benefit the city -- and most of its inhabitants -- in the decades to come.


He/they were the better negotiators in the room, that's for sure, and I definitely think that sports, and sporting teams have this magic halo about them that causes civic leaders, and punch card Joes to grow blinders. I think he filled the Fox building with people that pay COD income tax. I know the staff of hundreds at the Fox were jobs that weren't there before. I know that the bars in that part of town weren't there in '88 when the place first opened, we frequented Skipper's in the Michigan Theatre building back then, one of the few places open anywhere near the Fox.
If I had my way there would be a cent go to professional sports, especially when there is a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow for private individuals. I still don't know how that became and acceptable idea, but it's here. I guess we also subsidize auto plants and certain supplier plants, but that's vastly different, there are shareholders, and the tax come-back is worth giving away the store.
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Re: Dead Celebrities

Postby Sterile Whites 48313 » Fri Feb 17, 2017 1:04 pm

Sterling Heights High School wrestling coach George "The Animal" Steele. Age 79.
Just another run of the mill suburban white devil, with an "Assault" weapon. Molon Labe.
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Re: Dead Celebrities

Postby middle aged female » Fri Feb 17, 2017 2:00 pm

Sterile Whites 48313 wrote:Sterling Heights High School wrestling coach George "The Animal" Steele. Age 79.


Thought it was Madison Heights. And didn't he own or partially own The Crash Landing on Dequindre at one time or another?
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Re: Dead Celebrities

Postby The Suburban Avenger » Fri Feb 17, 2017 3:34 pm

Sterile Whites 48313 wrote:Sterling Heights High School wrestling coach George "The Animal" Steele. Age 79.


It might have been the first Pistons game I ever covered.
Before the game, the media and folks who work for PS&E get fed in a room near the loading dock, which often means a bit of a line to get to the grub. That time, there was an older, bald man in front of me. When he finished building his plate, he bumped into me when he turned around to leave. He told me he was sorry and it dawned on me that, yup, that was George The Animal Steele.
Very nice guy, and from what I would hear from others, he was a super dude most of his life.
Hope the padding in the turnbuckle tastes good in WWF heaven.
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Re: Dead Celebrities

Postby guest » Sat Feb 25, 2017 10:20 pm

local TV talking head Ron Savage has been promoted to that channel in the sky
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Re: Dead Celebrities

Postby middle aged female » Sun Feb 26, 2017 11:29 am

Now Bill Paxton?? 61 year old star of Aliens, Twister, Apollo 13, etc. RIP
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Re: Dead Celebrities

Postby Exciteable » Sun Feb 26, 2017 5:33 pm

Image
It's not as easy as it used to be finding time to let my mind wander.
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Re: Dead Celebrities

Postby middle aged female » Sat Mar 18, 2017 7:08 pm

Chuck Berry is on his way to the big sock hop in the ether. He was 90.
Cross post to "I thought he was dead for 10 yrs"
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