Hot Fudge Book Club

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Re: Hot Fudge Book Club

Postby April St.Clair » Wed Jan 08, 2014 12:00 pm

middle aged female wrote:
April St.Clair wrote:Brotha got me "The Complete Illustrated Encyclopedia of Royal Britain" by Charles Phillips for Christmas. It doesn't go as far back as my other book "British Kings and Queens" by Mike Ashley; however, Phillips goes more into the personal details and traits of the Kings and Queens than Ashley does. Phillips also includes the various castles that Kings and Queens grew up in and personal favorite retreats of said monarchy. As a person who has never been to England, it's a treat.

Have you read Antonia Fraser's "Kings and Queens Of England" or her "Six Wives of King Henry the Eighth"? Those are two of my favorite references for the British monarchy. I just got done watching the first two seasons of Monarchy with David Starkey. I took me up through Cromwell and then I realized Netflix didn't have season three. It's a good thing I know how it ends.


No, I haven't read those books. I try not to watch series based on Royalty either (The Tudors, Reign) because I get disappointed with the lack of proper details (Henry VIII was tall and had red hair, Mary Queen of Scots had nothing to do with Francis' death from a septic ear infection and she was barely a teen when she was married to him).

I find it strange that William I oldest son Robert of Normandy was denied the English thrown twice in his lifetime by his two younger brothers. How different history would have been had he ruled instead? Maybe it wouldn't have been that different since William II death was probably handed out by the youngest and ambitious son Henry I.
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Re: Hot Fudge Book Club

Postby middle aged female » Wed Jan 08, 2014 1:28 pm

April St.Clair wrote:
middle aged female wrote:
April St.Clair wrote:Brotha got me "The Complete Illustrated Encyclopedia of Royal Britain" by Charles Phillips for Christmas. It doesn't go as far back as my other book "British Kings and Queens" by Mike Ashley; however, Phillips goes more into the personal details and traits of the Kings and Queens than Ashley does. Phillips also includes the various castles that Kings and Queens grew up in and personal favorite retreats of said monarchy. As a person who has never been to England, it's a treat.

Have you read Antonia Fraser's "Kings and Queens Of England" or her "Six Wives of King Henry the Eighth"? Those are two of my favorite references for the British monarchy. I just got done watching the first two seasons of Monarchy with David Starkey. I took me up through Cromwell and then I realized Netflix didn't have season three. It's a good thing I know how it ends.


No, I haven't read those books. I try not to watch series based on Royalty either (The Tudors, Reign) because I get disappointed with the lack of proper details (Henry VIII was tall and had red hair, Mary Queen of Scots had nothing to do with Francis' death from a septic ear infection and she was barely a teen when she was married to him).

I find it strange that William I oldest son Robert of Normandy was denied the English thrown twice in his lifetime by his two younger brothers. How different history would have been had he ruled instead? Maybe it wouldn't have been that different since William II death was probably handed out by the youngest and ambitious son Henry I.

Yes, there was a good chance the Henry I would have gotten rid of both brothers to take the throne.
I don't think Mary would have killed Francis either; she was pretty much raised in the French court and probably would have preferred to remain its queen rather than be returned to heathen Scotland.
I don't watch those manufactured for TV royalty shows either; nor do I read the books like "The Other Boleyn Girl" or whatever it's called. It drives me crazy when they start making up things to fit their story or add characters to the mix who didn't exist in the time period. I've never watched one episode of The Tudors but I did try to watch "The White Queen" on cable, but gave it up after the second episode. I almost threw something at the TV during The Other Boleyn Girl.
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Re: Hot Fudge Book Club

Postby April St.Clair » Wed Jan 08, 2014 10:00 pm

middle aged female wrote:
April St.Clair wrote:
middle aged female wrote:
April St.Clair wrote:Brotha got me "The Complete Illustrated Encyclopedia of Royal Britain" by Charles Phillips for Christmas. It doesn't go as far back as my other book "British Kings and Queens" by Mike Ashley; however, Phillips goes more into the personal details and traits of the Kings and Queens than Ashley does. Phillips also includes the various castles that Kings and Queens grew up in and personal favorite retreats of said monarchy. As a person who has never been to England, it's a treat.

Have you read Antonia Fraser's "Kings and Queens Of England" or her "Six Wives of King Henry the Eighth"? Those are two of my favorite references for the British monarchy. I just got done watching the first two seasons of Monarchy with David Starkey. I took me up through Cromwell and then I realized Netflix didn't have season three. It's a good thing I know how it ends.


No, I haven't read those books. I try not to watch series based on Royalty either (The Tudors, Reign) because I get disappointed with the lack of proper details (Henry VIII was tall and had red hair, Mary Queen of Scots had nothing to do with Francis' death from a septic ear infection and she was barely a teen when she was married to him).

I find it strange that William I oldest son Robert of Normandy was denied the English thrown twice in his lifetime by his two younger brothers. How different history would have been had he ruled instead? Maybe it wouldn't have been that different since William II death was probably handed out by the youngest and ambitious son Henry I.

Yes, there was a good chance the Henry I would have gotten rid of both brothers to take the throne.
I don't think Mary would have killed Francis either; she was pretty much raised in the French court and probably would have preferred to remain its queen rather than be returned to heathen Scotland.
I don't watch those manufactured for TV royalty shows either; nor do I read the books like "The Other Boleyn Girl" or whatever it's called. It drives me crazy when they start making up things to fit their story or add characters to the mix who didn't exist in the time period. I've never watched one episode of The Tudors but I did try to watch "The White Queen" on cable, but gave it up after the second episode. I almost threw something at the TV during The Other Boleyn Girl.


Ha ha yeah, I can't imagine King Henry VIII giving two squirts about Mary Boleyn. I can't imagine him giving two squirts about ANY female (other than Jane, his third wife... but that's only because she gave him a son then died before he could get rid of her)

Although Cate Blanchett was a convincing Queen Elizabeth I, both of the movies were full of rumors and scandal.

I watched one episode of Reign and regretted it. The main characters were too old (Mary Queen of Scots and Francis) and Nostradamus wasn't a regular at the French court (he is there all the time!).
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Re: Hot Fudge Book Club

Postby middle aged female » Wed Jan 08, 2014 10:34 pm

April St.Clair wrote:
middle aged female wrote:
April St.Clair wrote:
middle aged female wrote:
April St.Clair wrote:Brotha got me "The Complete Illustrated Encyclopedia of Royal Britain" by Charles Phillips for Christmas. It doesn't go as far back as my other book "British Kings and Queens" by Mike Ashley; however, Phillips goes more into the personal details and traits of the Kings and Queens than Ashley does. Phillips also includes the various castles that Kings and Queens grew up in and personal favorite retreats of said monarchy. As a person who has never been to England, it's a treat.

Have you read Antonia Fraser's "Kings and Queens Of England" or her "Six Wives of King Henry the Eighth"? Those are two of my favorite references for the British monarchy. I just got done watching the first two seasons of Monarchy with David Starkey. I took me up through Cromwell and then I realized Netflix didn't have season three. It's a good thing I know how it ends.


No, I haven't read those books. I try not to watch series based on Royalty either (The Tudors, Reign) because I get disappointed with the lack of proper details (Henry VIII was tall and had red hair, Mary Queen of Scots had nothing to do with Francis' death from a septic ear infection and she was barely a teen when she was married to him).

I find it strange that William I oldest son Robert of Normandy was denied the English thrown twice in his lifetime by his two younger brothers. How different history would have been had he ruled instead? Maybe it wouldn't have been that different since William II death was probably handed out by the youngest and ambitious son Henry I.

Yes, there was a good chance the Henry I would have gotten rid of both brothers to take the throne.
I don't think Mary would have killed Francis either; she was pretty much raised in the French court and probably would have preferred to remain its queen rather than be returned to heathen Scotland.
I don't watch those manufactured for TV royalty shows either; nor do I read the books like "The Other Boleyn Girl" or whatever it's called. It drives me crazy when they start making up things to fit their story or add characters to the mix who didn't exist in the time period. I've never watched one episode of The Tudors but I did try to watch "The White Queen" on cable, but gave it up after the second episode. I almost threw something at the TV during The Other Boleyn Girl.


Ha ha yeah, I can't imagine King Henry VIII giving two squirts about Mary Boleyn. I can't imagine him giving two squirts about ANY female (other than Jane, his third wife... but that's only because she gave him a son then died before he could get rid of her)

Although Cate Blanchett was a convincing Queen Elizabeth I, both of the movies were full of rumors and scandal.

I watched one episode of Reign and regretted it. The main characters were too old (Mary Queen of Scots and Francis) and Nostradamus wasn't a regular at the French court (he is there all the time!).

He did sleep with Mary before he had Anne, but then he slept with most of the ladies of the court. The only reason he moved Heaven and Earth to marry Anne is because she wouldn't give in and sleep with him. In retrospect, if she were here to discuss it, I'll bet she regretted holding out on ol' Hank. Should have given it up and kept her head. But then, there would have been no Elizabeth R.
The wisest of his Queens was number 4, Ann of Cleves. Let him have the divorce and keep a place at court and be an Aunt to the royal kiddies. AND she didn't have to sleep with the old goat.
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Re: Hot Fudge Book Club

Postby guest » Mon Dec 07, 2015 12:40 am

I've been seeing things here and there about Aaron Foley and his advice book for white people moving to Detroit. It sounded like something I might look for at the library until MetroTimes ran an excerpt this week. Sorry, nothing there I haven't been hearing for the last ten years. Now if only I had the five minutes it took for me to read it back.

Oh, and thumbs up to DPL for not having it on order.
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Re: Hot Fudge Book Club

Postby Morty » Tue Apr 04, 2017 6:41 pm

Reading "Nightmare in Detroit, a rebellion and its victims" (1968) by Van Gordon Sauter and Burleigh Hines, published by the Henry Regnery Company (LOC card no. 68-19792)

With the 50th anniversary coming up this summer I thought this would be a good thing to read. I was 8 years old at the time, we lived in NW Detroit (7 mile & Evergreen hood) and my memories of not being able to leave our postage stamp of a yard are still strong, and the apprehension of my parents.

Very good account of the event. The most striking thing is that most of the book is devoted to telling the story of each and every of the 43 people killed in that 8 day period. One theme comes up time and time again, someone established as a "basically good guy" happened by a looting scene, joined in the party because of the opportunity and paid with their life. Shopkeepers trying to guard their little mom and pop stores were coming in second.
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Re: Hot Fudge Book Club

Postby Craig » Wed Apr 05, 2017 10:12 am

Morty wrote:Reading "Nightmare in Detroit, a rebellion and its victims" (1968) by Van Gordon Sauter and Burleigh Hines, published by the Henry Regnery Company (LOC card no. 68-19792)

With the 50th anniversary coming up this summer I thought this would be a good thing to read. I was 8 years old at the time, we lived in NW Detroit (7 mile & Evergreen hood) and my memories of not being able to leave our postage stamp of a yard are still strong, and the apprehension of my parents.

Very good account of the event. The most striking thing is that most of the book is devoted to telling the story of each and every of the 43 people killed in that 8 day period. One theme comes up time and time again, someone established as a "basically good guy" happened by a looting scene, joined in the party because of the opportunity and paid with their life. Shopkeepers trying to guard their little mom and pop stores were coming in second.


I was around for the riot but I was too young to have any memories. My parents' recollection of the riot's beginning says a lot for the time and the sharp contrast to today. We were living on the west side but the family spent Sunday morning at church and then the afternoon with friends and family in "the old neighborhood" an enclave at Michigan and Martin. The ride home started uneventfully until they drove past an appliance store on Grand River that was in the process of being looted. My dad headed over to the closes precinct house to report what was happening. As the old man (young man then, younger than the youngsters who work for me today) hurried into the precinct he stopped a sergeant hurrying out who gave a wry laugh upon hearing about the store. He pointed over my father's shoulder to the distant horizon that was filled with smoke and broke the news that the city was liteally exploding. Very interesting to recall that there was a time when news was slow to break and every little incident wasn't captured on a camera phone with the sing-song voice-over of "World Star!"

Somewhere along the way I read an account of the riot that recalled people contacting police afterward to report looted goods showing up on their porches. The interpretation was that some of Morty's "basically good guys" had second thoughts and in a half-assed way gave back ill-gotten gains. I hope that this happened, but having seen the gleeful post-Katrina pillaging I find the account hard to believe.
Soon I discovered that this rock-thing was true...
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Re: Hot Fudge Book Club

Postby Morty » Wed Apr 05, 2017 10:23 am

Craig wrote:
Morty wrote:Reading "Nightmare in Detroit, a rebellion and its victims" (1968) by Van Gordon Sauter and Burleigh Hines, published by the Henry Regnery Company (LOC card no. 68-19792)

With the 50th anniversary coming up this summer I thought this would be a good thing to read. I was 8 years old at the time, we lived in NW Detroit (7 mile & Evergreen hood) and my memories of not being able to leave our postage stamp of a yard are still strong, and the apprehension of my parents.

Very good account of the event. The most striking thing is that most of the book is devoted to telling the story of each and every of the 43 people killed in that 8 day period. One theme comes up time and time again, someone established as a "basically good guy" happened by a looting scene, joined in the party because of the opportunity and paid with their life. Shopkeepers trying to guard their little mom and pop stores were coming in second.


I was around for the riot but I was too young to have any memories. My parents' recollection of the riot's beginning says a lot for the time and the sharp contrast to today. We were living on the west side but the family spent Sunday morning at church and then the afternoon with friends and family in "the old neighborhood" an enclave at Michigan and Martin. The ride home started uneventfully until they drove past an appliance store on Grand River that was in the process of being looted. My dad headed over to the closes precinct house to report what was happening. As the old man (young man then, younger than the youngsters who work for me today) hurried into the precinct he stopped a sergeant hurrying out who gave a wry laugh upon hearing about the store. He pointed over my father's shoulder to the distant horizon that was filled with smoke and broke the news that the city was liteally exploding. Very interesting to recall that there was a time when news was slow to break and every little incident wasn't captured on a camera phone with the sing-song voice-over of "World Star!"

Somewhere along the way I read an account of the riot that recalled people contacting police afterward to report looted goods showing up on their porches. The interpretation was that some of Morty's "basically good guys" had second thoughts and in a half-assed way gave back ill-gotten gains. I hope that this happened, but having seen the gleeful post-Katrina pillaging I find the account hard to believe.


Another dredged up memory of mine: The city shut down the sale of liquor,beer and wine that extended (I think) into the suburbs just north of the city, with cooperation from same. My dad was out of beer, and it was beginning to to bother him. We were in our back yard, and the old man was talking to our neighbor two doors up over the fences. He brought up how he was out of beer and our neighbor said "I quit drinking after new year's, I have a case of beer in my garage if you want it"
The old man put it into gear, went to neighbor Al's house and carried back an eight-month old case of very warm Pabst Blue Ribbon. He was a Strohs man, and this beer was above piss warm, but he couldn't help himself, he cracked one open. The rest went into the fridge.
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Re: Hot Fudge Book Club

Postby Craig » Wed Apr 05, 2017 12:17 pm

Morty wrote:He was a Strohs man...


I believe that you had to be a communist or something equally bad to not favor Stroh's in that era. My earliest memory of beer is sitting on my father's lap and having a sip from his longneck Strohs. All beer since those days has never tasted the same.

Back to the books: I'm failing badly to find the title and proper reference to a treatise on DRUM set around the time of the riots. DRUM was Dodge Revolutionary Union Movement, a black militant reform group within the UAW at Dodge Main. Anyway, years ago I worked at EMU and shared an office with an old radical who was never around. It was during another long boring stretch of office hourse that I spotted and pulled down an activists historian's workup on the black man's rising. Like I said, title, author, and publisher are lost to me lo these many year's past, but what stayed with me were accounts of Highland Park and Hamtramck police breaking up the DRUM meetings with axe handles. Viewed from decades on the 60s truly were a time of social upheaval and I'm at least a little surprised that the fallout wasn't worse.
Soon I discovered that this rock-thing was true...
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Re: Hot Fudge Book Club

Postby Morty » Thu Apr 06, 2017 2:13 pm

Craig wrote:
Morty wrote:He was a Strohs man...


I believe that you had to be a communist or something equally bad to not favor Stroh's in that era. My earliest memory of beer is sitting on my father's lap and having a sip from his longneck Strohs. All beer since those days has never tasted the same.

Back to the books: I'm failing badly to find the title and proper reference to a treatise on DRUM set around the time of the riots. DRUM was Dodge Revolutionary Union Movement, a black militant reform group within the UAW at Dodge Main. Anyway, years ago I worked at EMU and shared an office with an old radical who was never around. It was during another long boring stretch of office hourse that I spotted and pulled down an activists historian's workup on the black man's rising. Like I said, title, author, and publisher are lost to me lo these many year's past, but what stayed with me were accounts of Highland Park and Hamtramck police breaking up the DRUM meetings with axe handles. Viewed from decades on the 60s truly were a time of social upheaval and I'm at least a little surprised that the fallout wasn't worse.


I have known a number of Chrysler retirees, some of whom "worked by Doche main" The mere mention of DRUM was enough to set them off on a rather racially biased diatribe, basically their view was "Dodge main was a great place to work until all those ___________ came in, then nothing was good enough for them" and that DRUM was tantamount to a communist organization. There are two sides to every story, and the truth usually lies somewhere in the middle of both extremes.
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Re: Hot Fudge Book Club

Postby guest » Mon Apr 10, 2017 2:10 pm

A new book by guy who bought one of those $500 houses. Yeah, I know, but it looks like it may be interesting.

Dude was wrapping up college and decided he'd buy a house and fix it up. His dad supported him by gifting him tools because he was happy his son was doing something besides writing poetry. The house itself was a shell full of garbage and a chopped up van. He meets the neighbors and settles in.

There's an excerpt here-
http://www.deadlinedetroit.com/articles ... OvHLbiHrSc
And if you go to the library website and put in his name you can find a long excerpt (click A Look Inside and scroll to Excerpt at the bottom and click Read More...)

It's not on the shelf yet, these things take time, but I don't even see it being in transit from receiving. The links above are kind of TLDR. I'll wait for the library to get it.
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